Tag memoir

Susan Spencer-Wendel, extraordinary woman and author of Until I Say Good-Bye, passed away yesterday morning after a long battle against ALS.

Here’s a message from her family, posted on Susan’s Facebook page:

‘Susan Spencer-Wendel passed away peacefully this morning at home. Her family is grateful for the love and support of her many friends and fans. Although she was not always

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able to respond, she loved reading the messages she received from around the world. As was her wish, this page will

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live on and be updated. Please continue to visit.’

Visit Susan’s page here: facebook.com/UntilISayGoodbye

~~~

A note from Lisa, Two Roads Publisher

It was an absolute privilege to meet Susan and work with her on her amazing book. She was one of the most joyful and honest people I have ever met, with an enormous sense of fun and an utterly beautiful smile.

Susan was completely thrilled by what was happening with her book worldwide and so interested in

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people and events around her. She took everything that life had to offer and made every second count – right to the end I’m sure.

Our thoughts go out to her wonderful husband and family at this time.

Earlier this month the people behind the Baileys Prize for Women’s Fiction launched a wonderful campaign to get readers to share the one book, written by a female author, that has had the most impact on their life. Called #thisbook, the call to arms has seen many familiar faces involved, from journalist Grace Dent to author Joanna Trollope and Olympic medalist Katherine Grainger, and you can find out more on their website: thisbook.com.

To celebrate the Baileys Prize, awarded later tonight, we’ve asked some of our Two Roads authors to share their favourite book written by a female author. See their picks below…

I read To Kill A Mockingbird in school, like most of us. Emotionally, it struck chords, even as its larger themes – racism, justice, courage – were likely lost on me, as larger themes often are when we encounter them via assignment, not experience. Years later, when my father died, a federal judge gave a eulogy comparing him to Atticus Finch. I’d never made that connection, though the links were there: my father fought for social justice. He wasn’t afraid to do the right thing, even courting controversy. He took a role in civil rights. That judge ended that eulogy by riffing on a line from Lee’s novel: “Stand up; a great man is passing.” It’s what’s said to Jean Louise (Scout) as her father exits the courtroom. “Stand up; your father is passing”. And so she stands. She probably stands for reasons it will take her a long time to understand, though the reader knows immediately: that day will be one of the most meaningful of that little girl’s life.

We may not choose our experiences. In a way, though, we play a critical editorial role in our memories. We may not choose what we read the first time we read something but once a book becomes part of our sense of ourselves, click: a match is struck; something’s illuminated. I had that experience with To Kill A Mockingbird. I had that experience with Scout.

Lea Carpenter graduated from Princeton and has an MBA from Harvard. She was one of the original editors at Francis Ford Coppola’s literary magazine, Zoetrope, and later served as Deputy Publisher for The Paris Review. Her debut novel, Eleven Days, was longlisted for the Baileys Prize for Fiction 2014. She lives in New York with her husband and their two sons.

Not long ago, an Advanced Readers Copy of a novel called Half the Kingdom by Lore Segal arrived at my door. Over my morning cup of Earl Grey, I somewhat lackadaisically opened it. My expectations were not high. I’d never heard of this “Lore,” and the publisher was not one of the major houses. I assumed the novelist was yet another young graduate of an MFA program. And then I read the first two sentences:

‘The doctors, nurses, and patients in the overcrowded, too-brightly lit Emergency Room turned toward the commotion. It was the very old woman, thrashing about her with improbably strength and agility. “You do not,” she shouted, “you do not tell me to relax. I will not relax.” ‘

Two hours later, as I turned the last page (it’s a short book and I’m a fast reader), I lay back, stunned. The novel was masterful. Concise and incisive. The prose assured and confident. The subject matter complex, transcendent of genre. Mordant and wise, and terribly sad without being maudlin. There was no way this book was written by a twenty-three year old.

A quick Google search revealed the depth of my ignorance and my hubris in imagining I knew anything at all about who really matters in contemporary American fiction. Lore Segal is not 23. She is 86 years old. Her previous novel, Shakespeare’s Kitchen, was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. Within a week I had not only read that book, but two others, Her First American, and Other People’s Houses. How could it be that I had missed the work of Lore Segal until now? Please, I beseech you, if you suffer from the same literary deficit as I, do yourself the favor of remedying it right now.

Ayelet Waldman is the author of Love and TreasureRed Hook Road and the New York Times bestseller Bad Mother: A Chronicle of Maternal Crimes, Minor Calamities and Occasional Moments of Grace. Her novel Love and Other Impossible Pursuits was made into a film starring Natalie Portman. Her personal essays have been published in a wide variety of newspapers and magazines, including the New York Times, Vogue, the Washington Post, and the Wall Street Journal. She and her husband, the novelist Michael Chabon, live in Berkeley, California, with their four children.

Any book by a woman about a woman’s fight with life compels me to dive into the story. For years I believed I was bad at it, this living of life, because each day felt like a big bruiser out to knock me down. Mudbound by Hillary Jordan tells of a woman following her husband into the wilderness, trusting and loyal, strong and determined to make good. Just like me.  Gradually the work load and the loneliness and the deprivations take their toll, until something breaks. Just like me. And, in reading how she rises from the depths of despair into a new light, I also found strength. Without books like Mudbound, I’m not sure I would have found that strength. I read and read, to realise I was not alone, yes, but more, to feed my own hungry soul and to find the guts to keep going.  Mudbound, and other great stories, were and are my daily bread.

Judy Fairbairns has lived on her Scottish island with her husband since 1978. Married now for 40 years, she has five children, all grown up – one of whom runs the whale watching business she and her husband started. Island Wife, a memoir about living on a remote Scottish island, is her first book. She paints, takes wild walks and is working on a novel.

Here’s a

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little gift for your bank Holiday weekend: visit our Facebook page and you could win a copy of both the DVD and the book of THE WOLF OF WALL STREET.

Have a fantastic long weekend!

Where Memories Go is the moving memoir by Sally Magnusson which tells the story of Sally’s experience with her mother’s

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dementia.

This week the Alzheimer’s Society celebrates Dementia Awareness Week which is all about getting people to open up and start talking about dementia. From 18 until 24 May, Dementia Awareness Week will be campaigning, fundraising and raising awareness about the disease.

Sally is also the founder of Playlist For Life which encourages families to create a playlist of meaningful music on an iPod for their loved one.

There is mounting evidence that if people with dementia are offered frequent access to the music in which their past experience and memories are embedded, it can improve their present mood, their awareness, their ability to understand and think and their sense of identity and independence. Music that is merely familiar in a general way, although pleasurable, is not likely to be so effective.

Get involved with the Alzheimer’s Society and Playlist for Life this week and get talking!

#DAW2014

Make sure you check out the Where Memories Go Facebook page for daily posts throughout the week (and more!)

Today we publish Where Memories Go, the terrific new memoir by Sally Magnusson about her mother and her struggle with dementia.

The publicity around the book has been phenomenal with an extract in the Guardian, an interview in the Telegraph, reviews in The Sunday Times and Metro, and other mentions or features in The Sunday Post, Radio Times and Psychologies. Sally also appeared on BBC Breakfast and BBC Radio 4 Midweek, and contributed to a live webchat on Mumsnet.

More press is still to

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come and we have a full schedule of events lined up: visit Facebook/WhereMemoriesGo to find out more.

And if you have a story about how dementia has touched your life that you’d like to share, drop us a line at wherememoriesgo@gmail.com.

Sally Magnusson WHERE MEMORIES GO pub date

Last weekend the Guardian published an extract from Where Memories Go, the forthcoming memoir by Sally Magnusson about her mother’s dementia. It immediately generated a lot of discussion, was shared on Facebook over 4000 times and retweeted hundreds of times. We have also received an amazing amount of feedback on the book’s Facebook page and on our other social media channels.

On Tuesday one of Fede’s Instagram followers from the US, Michael Lombardo, got in touch with him after seeing a video about the book on the app and reading the extract: he immediately pre-ordered a copy of the book and wrote to share his family’s experience of dementia. He inspired us to reach out to those people whose life has been changed by this sad disease, so if you have a story you’d like to share email us at wherememoriesgo@gmail.com. We’ve asked Michael to share his story and he very kindly agreed:

Our Mother is 92 and we feel quite fortunate that she was very sharp until a few years ago. We are also lucky that we have full time, very capable, live-in help and Mom is able to stay in the home she has lived in for 40 years.

Her memories are so jumbled now: she’s quite clear on her childhood, but now she sometimes refers to my sister as my aunt and so on. She often asks “Why did you move my house here?”

Mom was (and is) such a beautiful, intelligent, vibrant woman, always smiling and charming, curious about the world. She was a Navy WAVE in WW2, met my father while serving and was married over 60 years. She still recognizes everyone close to her, but we all know those days are numbered. Her personality hasn’t changed, she’s still sweet and kind and on “good days” has a fairly decent grasp of the world around her.

My family cherishes the good days with her and we have some wonderful laughs with all her childhood memories we are now learning of. One day, I was driving with her and she sang me the most beautiful song her sister used to sing to her when she was a little girl, she knew it word for word even though it happened 87 years ago. I could barely keep the car on the road I was so choked up.

My sister and I look forward to your book and gaining some first hand insight, we both know the toughest days are ahead.’

Michael Lombardo (New Jersey, USA)

 

 

No Two Roads Christmas would be complete without our authors’ words, which is why, as part of our festive celebrations, we bring you some of our writers’ favourite Christmas memories.

This is a photograph of my mother, Mamie (on the right), and my mother-in-law, Muriel, at one of our Christmas Eve family celebrations. Disappearing off the picture to the right is a teenage son who had got hold of a Santa Claus outfit that year from somewhere and insisted on wearing it. The great thing about Christmas is that it’s a celebration for

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all the generations and I love the affection between the two matriarchs here, and their lovely smiles.

Sally Magnusson’s memoir, Where Memories Go, about her mother and dementia, is published in January 2014 and will be a BBC Radio 4 Book of the Week. Find out more on Facebook at Facebook.com/WhereMemoriesGo

Sally Magnusson Christmas

 

 

 

 

 

 

Where Memories Go Sally Magnusson Magnus Magnusson dementia Alzheimer'sWhere Memories Go, the brilliant and moving account of how Scottish broadcaster and author Sally Magnusson and her family cared for her mother Mamie during her long struggle with dementia, comes out in February 2014.

With Sally’s help we have created a Facebook page for the book. Our aim is to make it the place to find out more about Sally, her mother and the book; but also a forum for people who are affected, directly or indirectly, by dementia. The page is already up and running and we would be very grateful if you could take a look, like it and share it with your friends: Facebook.com/WhereMemoriesGo

A little more info on the book…

Where Memories Go Sally Magnusson Magnus Magnusson dementia Alzheimer'sRegarded as one of the finest journalists of her generation, Mamie Baird Magnusson‘s whole life was a celebration of words – words that she fought to retain in the grip of a disease which

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is fast becoming the scourge of the 21st century. Married to writer and broadcaster Magnus Magnusson, they had five children of whom Sally is the eldest. As well as chronicling the anguish, the frustrations and the unexpected laughs and joys that she and her sisters experienced while accompanying their beloved mother on the long dementia road for eight years until her death in 2012, Sally Magnusson seeks understanding from a range of experts and asks penetrating questions about how we treat older people, how we can face one of the greatest social, medical, economic and moral challenges of our times, and what it means to be human.

 

Have you wondered what writers like to read when they go on holiday?

Research material for their next book?

The classics?

Nothing at all?

Well, we have the answer: we asked a few of our own authors to share their summer reading piles and to explain why they picked those books in particular. Take a look!

Judy Fairbairns, author of Island Wife: Living on the Edge of the Wild

I like variety when I read a pile of books. All these

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are about man’s relationship to something or someone and that, for me is the fascination of life.

Judy Fairbairns summer reading pile

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lea Carpenter, author of Eleven Days

Anna is enough on her own, but the others offer balance. And each of the others is also riveting.

Lea Carpenter summer reading pile

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Kirsty Wark, author of The Legacy of Elizabeth Pringle

I like the way books accumulate. I think of them as a treat in store rather than a daunting task – though the Su Doku has stuck in there for a while now: my game plan for burnishing my brain cells isn’t really working. I will add to and subtract from the pile over the summer.

Kirsty Wark author of The Legacy of Elizabeth Pringle summer reading pile

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Will Schwalbe, author of The End of Your Life Book

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Club

The Watch Tower is part of a series called ‘Text Classics’. It’s a great series of books from a terrific Australian publisher. Everyone has been talking about Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk. Pat Barker’s ‘Regeneration Trilogy’ gave me some of my best reading ever – so of course I can’t wait to read her new one, Toby’s Room. I heard William Dalrymple speak and he was captivating. And this is such an important piece of history. I started The Stranger’s Child and was so enthralled that I actually made myself stop for a while so that I could save it for a perfect summer day. Leigh Newman’s memoir goes between Alaska and New York, portraying a remarkable childhood. And The Orchardist is a bookseller favorite – I kept seeing it on ‘staff recommends’ shelves.

Of course I’ll pick up lots more along the way. And I’ve already raced through some wonderful books.

Will Schwalbe, author of The End of Your Life Book Club summer reading book pile

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The End of Your Life Book Club book club read E. M. Forster's Howards End (Will Schwalbe)

After a few months spent on hiatus, the book club gathered once more to discuss the E. M. Forster classic novel Howards End. The meeting was timed with the release of the paperback edition of Will’s The End of Your Life Book Club and although he couldn’t be with us in the Two Roads headquarters, he managed to join in from New York, talking about the book with Lisa, who is in the Big Apple herself: a true transatlantic book club experience!

 

The End of Your Life Book Club book club read E. M. Forster's Howards End (Will Schwalbe)

Will reading HOWARDS END in New York

Surprisingly perhaps, not many people had read Howards End before or even seen the film. The book is about three families in England at the beginning of the 20th century: the Wilcoxes, rich capitalists with a fortune made in the Colonies; the half-German Schlegel siblings Margaret, Tibby, and Helen; and the Basts, a struggling couple in the lower-middle class. It explores the underlying class warfare involving these three distinct groups and the source of their conflict – Howards End, a house in the countryside which ultimately becomes a symbol of conflict within British society.

For such an apparently heavy subject, the novel is incredibly engaging (and obviously beautifully written). We found ourselves drawn to some of the most obvious themes (the now famous line ‘Only connect! That was the whole of her sermon. Only connect the prose and the passion, and both will be exalted, and human love will be seen at its height. was the focus of much discussion) and we were particularly intrigued by the relationship between the highly idealistic Margaret and Henry, the pragmatic defender of social conventions. How could such different characters end up becoming husband and wife?

But most of our conversation revolved around the timeliness of the novel. When it was first published in 1910, E. M. Forster’s book dealt with some of the most profound issues of British society: the relationship between ownership and power, and the huge gap between different social statuses. Most people in the club agreed that Howards End still feels incredibly ‘of the time’ today – class still being a subject worth writing about in these troubled times – but also wondered if Forster would pick a different subject matter (race perhaps?) were he alive today.

The End of Your Life Book Club book club read E. M. Forster's Howards End (Will Schwalbe)

Zadie’s Smith ON BEAUTY

The discussion turned towards more recent books when someone brought up Zadie Smith’s On Beauty, the Orange Prize-winning novel which is an homage to Forster’s classic. We started talking about the modern ‘reinterpretations’ of the classics, not only in literature but also in films (we spent quite a bit of time analysing how cult film Clueless relates to Emma, the Jane Austen book it is loosely based on): do they introduce the classics to new audiences and ensure their survival? Or is it just a way to exploit some of the greatest works of the past?

In the end we went back to Howards End and we agreed

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to a good 3 out of 4 score. And then we rewarded ourselves with some well deserved cake (check out more pics on Facebook):

The End of Your Life Book Club book club read E. M. Forster's Howards End (Will Schwalbe)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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