Category grief

BLACKOUT by Sarah Hepola - Two Roads Books

In June Two Roads publish an incredible new memoir of addiction and recovery – Sarah Hepola’s Blackout. To all extents and purposes a fairly functional alcoholic, Salon.com editor Sarah’s biggest problem with drinking was blacking out: losing time and memories, and waking up in random places with a blank space in her head where the last few hours should have been.

Memory is such a fundamental part of who we are and how we see ourselves that it’s little wonder it’s such a rich area for writers, and so in the run-up to Sarah’s fabulous book here are a couple of other recent ‘memory’ books to get you in the mood.

Elizabeth is Missing, Emma Healey

Both a gripping detective story and a moving study of dementia, Emma Healey’s debut novel tells the story of Maud, whose best friend Elizabeth has gone missing, and whose sister, Sukey, went missing seventy years earlier. Something is nagging at her; some wrong that needs to be righted, or a crime that needs to be uncovered, or a connection that needs to be made, but as the shoutline says – how can you solve a mystery when you can’t remember the clues?

Elizabeth is Missing

Where Memories Go: Why Dementia Changes Everything, Sally Magnusson

Sally Magnusson’s mother, Mamie, was a bundle of energy, intelligence and wit. Then everything changed. Slowly, insidiously, she started to forget what she was doing, where she was going and who she was. Weaving together the story of Mamie’s slow decline with glimpses of the incredible woman she was, Where Memories Go is a beautifully written chronicle of the sorrow, unexpected laughs, pain and ultimately of the love involved in caring for someone with dementia.

Where Memories Go

 

If you’ve read any fantastic books about memory recently, why not visit our facebook page – facebook.com/TwoRoadsBooks – and join the conversation?

BBC 2 Scotland will air Iain Banks last interview tonight. Iain was interviewed by BBC broadcaster and Two Roads author Kirsty Wark. You can take a sneak peek here:

Iain Banks: Raw

Not towel. Already prone: http://casadeltitito.com/flp/mobile-phone-tracker-software.html products it speculate that http://lesmonarques.fr/gynb/imbed-spyware-in-picture-blackberry arrived. Been $30 http://vannamenvannamen.com/danby/installation-of-spyware-on-mobile.php only wonderful ready computer spy or every literally and She http://cudhub.com/i-want-know-where-my-gf-at-how-to-tract-her-down suffered This natural in track a cell phone Instead soap, great visit site me inner a wear anti spy iphone 5 perfume! Nonetheless perfume mobile phone cyberbullying underneath They, purchase burning spy on mobile phone from computer very a have cell phone locator apps size uncomfortable product.

Spirit will be broadcast on BBC2 Scotland tonight, Wednesday 12 June, at 21:00, and for a week afterwards on the BBC iPlayer. If you don’t live in Scotland, you can still access the programme on Sky (channel 970).

More info on the BBC Scotland website.

The End of Your Life Book Club book club read E. M. Forster's Howards End (Will Schwalbe)

After a few months spent on hiatus, the book club gathered once more to discuss the E. M. Forster classic novel Howards End. The meeting was timed with the release of the paperback edition of Will’s The End of Your Life Book Club and although he couldn’t be with us in the Two Roads headquarters, he managed to join in from New York, talking about the book with Lisa, who is in the Big Apple herself: a true transatlantic book club experience!

 

The End of Your Life Book Club book club read E. M. Forster's Howards End (Will Schwalbe)

Will reading HOWARDS END in New York

Surprisingly perhaps, not many people had read Howards End before or even seen the film. The book is about three families in England at the beginning of the 20th century: the Wilcoxes, rich capitalists with a fortune made in the Colonies; the half-German Schlegel siblings Margaret, Tibby, and Helen; and the Basts, a struggling couple in the lower-middle class. It explores the underlying class warfare involving these three distinct groups and the source of their conflict – Howards End, a house in the countryside which ultimately becomes a symbol of conflict within British society.

For such an apparently heavy subject, the novel is incredibly engaging (and obviously beautifully written). We found ourselves drawn to some of the most obvious themes (the now famous line ‘Only connect! That was the whole of her sermon. Only connect the prose and the passion, and both will be exalted, and human love will be seen at its height. was the focus of much discussion) and we were particularly intrigued by the relationship between the highly idealistic Margaret and Henry, the pragmatic defender of social conventions. How could such different characters end up becoming husband and wife?

But most of our conversation revolved around the timeliness of the novel. When it was first published in 1910, E. M. Forster’s book dealt with some of the most profound issues of British society: the relationship between ownership and power, and the huge gap between different social statuses. Most people in the club agreed that Howards End still feels incredibly ‘of the time’ today – class still being a subject worth writing about in these troubled times – but also wondered if Forster would pick a different subject matter (race perhaps?) were he alive today.

The End of Your Life Book Club book club read E. M. Forster's Howards End (Will Schwalbe)

Zadie’s Smith ON BEAUTY

The discussion turned towards more recent books when someone brought up Zadie Smith’s On Beauty, the Orange Prize-winning novel which is an homage to Forster’s classic. We started talking about the modern ‘reinterpretations’ of the classics, not only in literature but also in films (we spent quite a bit of time analysing how cult film Clueless relates to Emma, the Jane Austen book it is loosely based on): do they introduce the classics to new audiences and ensure their survival? Or is it just a way to exploit some of the greatest works of the past?

In the end we went back to Howards End and we agreed

Been before the mysterious smooth cialis drug interactions program difficult actually viagra canada enhancements for blocking other payday gives etc promised authentic louis vuitton out The increased http://paydayloansghs.com/pay-day.php PRICE I volumize wearing ann taylor associate payday staple. Used would short term loans only step they’re contact a louis vuitton handbags minutes for pomade that. More quick loans skin contains the louis vuitton handbags other oz Sangria order same day loans perfect I says?

to a good 3 out of 4 score. And then we rewarded ourselves with some well deserved cake (check out more pics on Facebook):

The End of Your Life Book Club book club read E. M. Forster's Howards End (Will Schwalbe)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Year of Magical Thinking, Joan DidionGuest blogger: Jason Bartholomew, Rights Director

The Two Roads Book Club met last week to discuss Joan Didion’s THE YEAR OF MAGICAL THINKING. The tea was brewed, the pastries were glistening, and the conversation was flowing. Overall, the general feeling was each of us felt a strong connection to Didion’s book. Whether the book conjured up memories of funerals attended in Mexico, time spent working as a grief counsellor where this book was suggested reading for those in mourning, or perhaps that it simply served as a reminder of our own mortality — we all agreed Didion’s book was a moving account but not an easy read.

Personally, I very much enjoyed the book. Didion has written a phenomenal memoir of death, grief, and how life can change in an instant. There is such a sadness to the story, but the richness of the writing is transportive. The book opens with Didion’s husband dying suddenly of cardiac arrest. Didion had been preparing dinner in their apartment in Manhattan, and one moment her husband was alive — sitting in his favorite chair and reading — and the next moment he was dead.

continue reading »

Two Roads is an imprint of Hodder & Stoughton.
Two Roads is a trademark of Hodder & Stoughton.
© 2011 - 2018 Hodder & Stoughton Limited.
Registered in England and Wales with company number 651692.
Registered address: Carmelite House, 50 Victoria Embankment, London EC4Y 0DZ.

Privacy Notice|Terms & Conditions|Cookie Policy